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  1. #21
    The "Godfather" of COAR Great-Kazoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irving View Post
    Concerning the Uniquetec powder bar, I thought I had seen you mention repeatability in another thread. I'm under the impression that with the makings on the side, I can find the spot I need for the drop I want for a specific load/powder, write it down, and then quickly return to that setting in the future. If that is correct, is it true that I can spend the money on one UniqueTec powder bar, and have a nice compromise of easy repeatability at a cost much lower than buying an additional powder measure for each tool head?
    You can but.............. additional powder measures allow you to have them ready to go for each powder used. If not, using one powder measure means you have to verify it's clear of any residual powder from last load. Before switching to a different powder.
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  2. #22
    I'm the OPie of this thread Irving's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Great-Kazoo View Post
    You can but.............. additional powder measures allow you to have them ready to go for each powder used. If not, using one powder measure means you have to verify it's clear of any residual powder from last load. Before switching to a different powder.
    That's not an issue because right now each caliber I load has a different powder, so it's part of the change procedure. Kind of like checking the chamber before pulling the trigger to break down a Glock.
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  3. #23
    Woodsmith with "Mod-like" Powers
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    Update on Whidden tool heads. They are crap. I have three for my 550. All three rock when pushed tight up against the press. My pet machinist took one and recut the top of the tenon dead flat. The high spots were 0.017" higher than the low spots. Crazy bad. The newly flattened toolhead displayed no rock in the press at all. I'm going to have him cut the other two, then we're considering offering the same product but with actual good machining processes used. Sheesh, I hate it when I pay extra for an "improvement" that actually makes something perform worse than the OEM gear.
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  4. #24
    Machine Gunner mattiooo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Great-Kazoo View Post
    You can but.............. additional powder measures allow you to have them ready to go for each powder used. If not, using one powder measure means you have to verify it's clear of any residual powder from last load. Before switching to a different powder.
    What's the best way to make sure it's clear? I'm assuming there are particles still stuck on the parts I can't see since they stick to the parts I can see.

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  5. #25
    The "Godfather" of COAR Great-Kazoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattiooo View Post
    What's the best way to make sure it's clear? I'm assuming there are particles still stuck on the parts I can't see since they stick to the parts I can see.
    I disassemble it, wipe with a dryer sheet. That's after using some low pressure compressed air to clear it out. Some think it's time consuming, but complain about spending money for another powder drop.
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  6. #26
    Machine Gunner mattiooo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattiooo View Post
    I wish I had learned about the Inline Fabrication Ultramount before I bought the Dillon Strong Mount. Might still do that eventually, but not right now.
    As predicted, I have ordered the Quick Change Ultramount and a bunch of base plates. My wife was getting annoyed with me doing things at the kitchen table with C-clamps and gear mounted to boards. I just got it, and will set it up this weekend. Got plates for the Dillon, my small vise, the Super Swager, and Lyman case cutter. I was thinking about leaving the Dillon mounted on the Strong Mount and putting the Ultramount next to it, but my reloading bench is just too small.

    I got the flush mount version of the Ultramount, though I'm not going to router out this bench. It's just a folding woodworking bench. If I ever convert my garage into the basement I don't have, I will put everything on a larger bench there.

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  7. #27
    Machine Gunner XC700116's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim K View Post
    Update on Whidden tool heads. They are crap. I have three for my 550. All three rock when pushed tight up against the press. My pet machinist took one and recut the top of the tenon dead flat. The high spots were 0.017" higher than the low spots. Crazy bad. The newly flattened toolhead displayed no rock in the press at all. I'm going to have him cut the other two, then we're considering offering the same product but with actual good machining processes used. Sheesh, I hate it when I pay extra for an "improvement" that actually makes something perform worse than the OEM gear.
    I don't know WTF is going on @ Whidden lately but the most recent set of dies that I bought and other's I know have had terrible issues. My BRX seater die was really bad, heard others have problems with them as well. I've gotten rid of all of mine and am back to 100% Redding sizing dies and Forster Micrometer seaters. My old Whidden 6X47 dies were great the BRX dies I bought 2 years later were complete crap. If I do decide to move to a 550 for precision reloading, I plan on buying a Uniquetek billet head and then modifying it with Forster lock rings to make the dies float like the Whidden head is designed.

  8. #28
    Woodsmith with "Mod-like" Powers
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    I modified all my 550 heads to floating dies, even the stock Dillon head. It's trivially easy to do.

    I had issues with my Whidden seater die, too. I'm glad to hear it wasn't just me. I'm done with those monkeys.
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  9. #29
    The "Godfather" of COAR Great-Kazoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim K View Post
    I modified all my 550 heads to floating dies, even the stock Dillon head. It's trivially easy to do.

    I had issues with my Whidden seater die, too. I'm glad to hear it wasn't just me. I'm done with those monkeys.
    Is this the one i saw many a year ago (somewhere on line) where you place an o-ring under the lock nut. Between it and the tool head? Or some other low budget but works deal.
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  10. #30
    Machine Gunner XC700116's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Great-Kazoo View Post
    Is this the one i saw many a year ago (somewhere on line) where you place an o-ring under the lock nut. Between it and the tool head? Or some other low budget but works deal.
    Kazoo, All you need to do is get Forster, Hornady (maybe) or Whidden die lock rings, screw a die in and back the ring off a bit and drill a hole through the ring into the head (correct size for a properly sized roll pin), then back it out and drill the hole in the ring out so there's a fair bit of clearance for the roll pin to have some wiggle room in the lock ring and drive a roll pin into the hole in the head sticking up enough for the lock ring to sit on it. Then drop the ring on the pin, screw die into ring and head to appropriate depth and lock down the pinch bolt on the lock ring. The pin in the head holds the ring from turning out when it's locked on the die, but doesn't preload the die against the head threads. This lets the die wobble in the threads a bit but still not move in or out.

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