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  1. #41
    Gong Shooter OxArt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip View Post
    I wonder how much of this is actually legal. Sure, you can sign away your rights under a vague ToS but that doesn't nullify state/Fed laws.
    What is theoretically illegal/legal based on a reading of a law isn't all that relevant. If a judge isn't willing to see things you're way after you threw $200,000 cash at a case (without any chance of recovery), it's legal.

    So yep, gotta follow the NDA's etc.

  2. #42
    Thinks Gravy Boats are SEXY ASF! izzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hollohas View Post
    Half the targeted ads I see are for stuff I already purchased. That's a HUGE waste of advertising money to target people who already have the product IMO.
    That always cracks me up. Especially when it's something you won't usually buy twice like a water heater.

  3. #43
    Possesses Antidote for "Cool" Gman's Avatar
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    Here's a fun one...

    Kaspersky AV injected unique ID that allowed sites to track users, even in incognito mode
    Antivirus software is something that can help people be safer and more private on the Internet. But its protections can cut both ways. A case in point: for almost four years, AV products from Kaspersky Lab injected a unique identifier into the HTML of every website a user visited, making it possible for sites to identify people even when using incognito mode or when they switched between Chrome, Firefox, or Edge.

    The identifier, as reported Thursday by c't Magazine, was part of a blob of JavaScript Kaspersky products injected into every page a user visited. The JavaScript, presented below this paragraph, was designed to, among other things, present a green icon that corresponded to safe links returned in search results.

    c't reporter Ronald Eikenberg found something unsettling about the JavaScript injected by the Kaspersky AV product installed on his test computer?the tag 9344FDA7-AFDF-4BA0-A915-4D7EEB9A6615 was unique to his machine, and it was injected into every single page he visited. It didn't matter if he used Chrome, Firefox, Edge, or Opera or whether he turned on incognito browsing. The identifier acted as a unique serial number that website operators could use to track him.

    Kaspersky stopped sending the identifier in June, after Eikenberg privately reported the behavior to the AV company. The identifier was introduced in the fall (for those in the Northern Hemisphere, anyway) of 2015. That meant that for close to four years, all consumer versions of Kaspersky software for Windows?including the free version, Kaspersky Internet Security, and Kaspersky Total Security?silently branded users with a unique identifier.
    Last edited by Gman; Yesterday at 07:18.
    "Be not intimidated...nor suffer yourselves to be wheedled out of your liberties by any pretense of politeness, delicacy, or decency.
    These, as they are often used, are but three different names for hypocrisy, chicanery and cowardice."
    ― John Adams
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts."
    Winston Churchill

  4. #44
    Gong Shooter OxArt's Avatar
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    Anyone using Kaspersky is nuts. There's "spyware", which we all know as advertisement harvesters, but the reason Kapersky has is real "SpyWare" that has nothing to do with ads. That's just the tip of the iceberg. It's sad really, Russia would probably have a lot more tourism if they didn't crawl so far up people's ass to see the stomach ulcers.

  5. #45
    Machine Gunner BladesNBarrels's Avatar
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    Russian tourism.
    Reminds me of the satirical song lyrics when Chevrolet and Dinah Shore were advertising, "See the USA in your Chevrolet" in their 1964 Go West Campaign

    See the USSR in your Armored Car
    Khrushchev is asking you to die!

    Dinah Shore and Chevrolet, 1964

    Last edited by BladesNBarrels; Yesterday at 09:56.
    It will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made by men of their own choice if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood.
    James Madison 1778

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  6. #46
    "Beef Bacon" Commie Grant H.'s Avatar
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    I will bet that most here have never read the full terms and conditions that go along with using an Apple/Android device... 99% of society can't be bothered to...

    You have a device that has the capability to listen to you, reach out to the servers at "home", and respond when "you want it to", but you happily assume that they only do this when you want them too... Right...

    A prime example of this is the FB messenger app. The permissions that folks agreed to, when installing this app, included the ability for the app to turn on/off all Radios, Cameras, and Microphones, without the permission, OR KNOWLEDGE, of the phone owner. Out of the "however many billions" that use FB, how many do you think don't have that app installed?

    The simple fact of the matter is that the majority of society runs off and buys into the latest and greatest technology without a thought as to their privacy and informational security.

    Same thing goes for the Amazon Alexa, Google Home, or any of the others...

    Along with all of this, if you believe that Amazon, Google, FB, Apple, etc don't willingly share the information that they collect with .gov and other TLA's, you're delusional...
    For your convenience, a link to my Feedback

  7. #47
    I'm the OPie of this thread Irving's Avatar
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    It's a little more than that people can't be bothered to read those terms and agreements. I was listening to a podcast about this very issue and they were saying that they took some pretty simple app (I don't remember which one) and printed the terms and agreements and it was over 500 pages or something ridiculous, and it took a team of people something like a week to even get through all of it. Those terms and agreements are purposely long and difficult reads (just like most of our proposed bills). That doesn't completely remove the responsibility of people of course.

    There are a few apps that I'd like to have installed on my phone, but since they want permission to view my contacts, location, photos, camera, and mic, I won't install them.

    I wish more people would refuse to use apps actually. It seems like EVERY company has some app they want you to install, and it really is a problem.
    Minimize, minimize, minimize.

  8. #48
    Machine Gunner Justin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant H. View Post
    I will bet that most here have never read the full terms and conditions that go along with using an Apple/Android device... 99% of society can't be bothered to...

    You have a device that has the capability to listen to you, reach out to the servers at "home", and respond when "you want it to", but you happily assume that they only do this when you want them too... Right...

    A prime example of this is the FB messenger app. The permissions that folks agreed to, when installing this app, included the ability for the app to turn on/off all Radios, Cameras, and Microphones, without the permission, OR KNOWLEDGE, of the phone owner. Out of the "however many billions" that use FB, how many do you think don't have that app installed?

    The simple fact of the matter is that the majority of society runs off and buys into the latest and greatest technology without a thought as to their privacy and informational security.

    Same thing goes for the Amazon Alexa, Google Home, or any of the others...

    Along with all of this, if you believe that Amazon, Google, FB, Apple, etc don't willingly share the information that they collect with .gov and other TLA's, you're delusional...
    Even if you do read the terms and conditions, so what?

    There's literally nothing you can do. You can't modify the terms. You can't adjust what the app does. Hell, you can't even go to a market competitor because any other company on the market is doing pretty much exactly the same thing. Your only options are literally to either submit entirely or be locked out of the technology and services that undergird nearly everything nowadays.

    There's literally no other mainstream option. If you care about your security you're either stuck being a luddite, or forced to take make staying private via technology into something akin to a secondary hobby.
    RATATATATATATATATATATABLAM

    If there's nothing wrong with having to show an ID to buy a gun, there's nothing wrong with having to show an ID to vote.

    For legal reasons, that's a joke.

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